Examination of global library issues using project based learning

Examination of global library issues using project based learning

This course provides students with the opportunity to examine select issues relating to global libraries in underserved communities with an emphasis on a specific regional context (Guatemala) of Librarians Without Borders (LWB). A project-based learning approach is used to support student investigations of specific authentic community needs translated from those broader issues. Project-based learning (PBL) is a teaching method in which students gain knowledge and skills by working for an extended period of time to investigate and respond to an engaging and complex question, problem, or challenge. For more information on PBL, read http://goo.gl/3MCkAR. Students will design and deliver a collaborative project. The issues the teams might investigate include literacy programming for second-language learners, collection development strategies for no-budget schools, asynchronous digital librarian training, family outreach strategies for open-library transitioning, school-community library partnerships, and assessment measures for school/community libraries. In addition to team evaluations, there are also individual assignments and checks to ensure that each student is contributing to overall team work. The role of the instructor in a PBL course is one of designer, facilitator, and coach. The instructor designs and sets up the problems, acts as a resource for teams, provides ongoing feedback and mentorship as students test alternative ideas, and helps promote students’ metacognitive growth by thinking aloud alongside them. In short, the instructor does not give teams the answers, so students should be comfortable with this different arrangement of the classroom. Note that academic libraries and their needs are not the focus of this course, rather school/public/community libraries is the context.

Class Name Examination of global library issues using project based learning
Host School San Jose State University
Class Identifier INFO 281
Credit Value 2 Credit Hours
Faculty Melanie Sellar
Course Tool (Online) Other
Class Description This course provides students with the opportunity to examine select issues relating to global libraries in underserved communities with an emphasis on a specific regional context (Guatemala) of Librarians Without Borders (LWB). A project-based learning approach is used to support student investigations of specific authentic community needs translated from those broader issues. Project-based learning (PBL) is a teaching method in which students gain knowledge and skills by working for an extended period of time to investigate and respond to an engaging and complex question, problem, or challenge. For more information on PBL, read http://goo.gl/3MCkAR. Students will design and deliver a collaborative project. The issues the teams might investigate include literacy programming for second-language learners, collection development strategies for no-budget schools, asynchronous digital librarian training, family outreach strategies for open-library transitioning, school-community library partnerships, and assessment measures for school/community libraries. In addition to team evaluations, there are also individual assignments and checks to ensure that each student is contributing to overall team work. The role of the instructor in a PBL course is one of designer, facilitator, and coach. The instructor designs and sets up the problems, acts as a resource for teams, provides ongoing feedback and mentorship as students test alternative ideas, and helps promote students’ metacognitive growth by thinking aloud alongside them. In short, the instructor does not give teams the answers, so students should be comfortable with this different arrangement of the classroom. Note that academic libraries and their needs are not the focus of this course, rather school/public/community libraries is the context.
Class Disclaimer 2 unit course. This course requires extensive team collaborations and teams are expected to meet weekly together. Teams usually meet 4-5 times at a day/time that works mutually for team members. Peers evaluate teammates and participation at meetings is included.  Students must meet the school's home computing and technology literacy prerequisites. See http://ischool.sjsu.edu/current-students/technology-support/home-computing-environment.
Delivery Asynchronous
Start and End Date September 18th, 2017 - October 1st, 2017
Start and End Time
(if synchronous)
Days of Week
(of class meetings, if synchronous)
Last Add Day August 9th, 2017
Residency Start and End Date No Residency
Syllabus Download Syllabus